Condom use - other info

When buying a condom it's a good idea to apply a gently pressure to the condom wrapper to make sure it has a slight pillow-like quality to it. This is caused by air inside the wrapper. If the wrapper is not pillow-like, that means the air has escaped through a puncture or tear in the wrapper, and the condom itself may be damaged as well.

If you feel the condom breaks while having sex, stop immediately and withdraw.

Don't reuse a condom. Use a new one each time you have vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Don't skimp, it might "cost" more than a new one.

When it comes to oral sex you need to wear a condom just as much as during vaginal or anal sex. Most Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) are transmitted through bodily fluids and mucus membranes. And these exist in and on your genitals as well as in your mouth. For oral sex use unlubricated condoms or try some flavored.

If you want to engage in anal sex use slightly thicker condoms which are specifically marketed for use during anal sex. They are less likely to tear than condoms designed for vaginal sex, and a plus of special lubricant.

Don't forget, condoms are not foolproof. No protection method is foolproof even if we talk about helmets, seatbelts or other protection stuff.

When used correctly and consistently male condoms are 97 % effective in preventing pregnancy. This means that if 100 women use the male condoms all the time and always correctly, 3 will have some troubles with an unwanted pregnancy in a year.

When used correctly and consistently female condoms are 95 % effective in preventing pregnancy. This means that if 100 women use the female condoms all the time and always correctly, 5 will have some troubles with an unwanted pregnancy in a year.

If we talk about protection against Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) we must know that effectiveness of condoms depends on the condom type we used. Latex condoms provide excellent protection against some STDs. Polyurethane condoms provide some protection against STDs, although it is still not clear how much. And lambskin condom (or natural condom), do not protect against STDs. The pores are too large to protect against the small particles that cause some STDs.

Also effectiveness of condoms depends on which type of STD we are talking about. Latex condoms are effective against STDs that travel in bodily fluids (blood, semen or vaginal fluids), such as the HIV/AIDS virus, hepatitis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea. Condoms are much less effective against STDs that are caused by organisms that live in sores on the genitals, such as syphilis. STDs like herpes and genital warts that occur on the genital skin can get transmitted from one partner to another even if a condom is used.

And at last but not least, the effectiveness of the condom against STDs depends on how correctly it is used every time.

In case it slipped out during intercourse or you notice it is torn go immediately to your GP and let her/him know. Ask for advice and the emergency contraception.

That's life, you know, the only 100 % risk free sex is the one you don't have. So what can you do ? Use condoms correctly and consistently and do your best to know the person you are "doing it" with. Try to find out as much information as you can about the person and keep you eyes wiiiiide open.